Monthly Archives: December 2012

Are you being served?

December 29, 2012
By
Are you being served?

“Oh no, no.  I can get it.  I don’t need to be waited on!” Have you ever said these words? If so, I invite you to ask yourself why. Your answer might purport to have something to do with humility, or not placing yourself above another. May I challenge you on that? The experience of…

Read more »

The Noise of Poverty; Understanding Its Power over Self & Other

December 27, 2012
By
The Noise of Poverty; Understanding Its Power over Self & Other

As I transition from the “West” to Uganda—yet again—I am anticipating the different sounds in the lifescape.  Some will welcome me, emoting joy and pleasure. Others will attack me in offensive ways, stirring negativity and frustration.  Others will be processed subconsciously—and yet will Read more [...]

Read more »

Things that ‘incite but don’t invite’ (5 phrases to avoid when in pursuit of civil discourse)

December 22, 2012
By
Things that ‘incite but don’t invite’ (5 phrases to avoid when in pursuit of civil discourse)

Those familiar with my blog and my work know that I am concerned about the lack of civil discourse in today's communications, especially in social media. People who claim to be passionate, knowledgeable, and educated seem not to value civility, and seem to have even less respect for the notion of a Read more [...]

Read more »

For those whose world will end today

December 21, 2012
By
For those whose world will end today

In the silly, wrongly interpreted hype about a Mayan celebration of the passage of time, I think it is very important that we not lose sight of those who are in need of our active compassion. I am mindful of the many people for whom the world will end today.  People who will lose their…

Read more »

Converting Confrontation Into Invitation (3 strategies for civil discourse)

December 17, 2012
By
Converting Confrontation Into Invitation (3 strategies for civil discourse)

A friend of mine—of another faith—told me that she recently went to her homeowners’ association meeting to confront them about the abundance of Christmas decorations in her apartment building.  She strongly argued that this was not an inclusive practice, and insisted that they do something to Read more [...]

Read more »

“The WD-40-Guy at Harvard” (An 80-second read on addressing distraction)

December 9, 2012
By
“The WD-40-Guy at Harvard” (An 80-second read on addressing distraction)

I remember well my first day of grad school.  I was awake early.  It surprised me how concerned I suddenly was about what I should wear.  (“You should have thought of this before!” I kept telling myself.) I finally settled on jeans, a sweater and a scarf—which—it turned out—so did everybody Read more [...]

Read more »

Excerpts from my homily at Marge Murdock’s memorial service

December 9, 2012
By

Saturday, December 8, 2012.  Camp Verde, AZ. "Through the miracle of faith, one can simultaneously experience grief at the end of a precious human experience, gratitude for the gift of engagement with a marvelous fellow spirit, and this glorious hope of heaven." "The precious nature of this human Read more [...]

Read more »

Nathaniel is CEO of AidChild.org. He holds a Master's Degree in Human Development and Psychology from Harvard University where he was a Reynolds Fellow in Social Entrepreneurship, and winner of the 2010 Harvard HDP Marshal Award. He also holds a PhD in Leadership Studies from the University of San Diego where he was the Dammeyer Fellow in Global Education Leadership, and a Cordes Fellow at Opportunity Collaboration. Nathaniel is author of "We Are Not Mahogany: Three stories about the male African life." Prior to his move to Uganda in 2000, Nathaniel was Deputy Director of the Office of the Governor of Arizona, and Director of Education at Leadership, Inc.

Download now our Android App


Direct Download
Just take a photo of the QR code by using an app like Barcode Scanner or visit this website with your smartphone and click on the "Direct Download" link.
Powered By WP App Maker